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I would love to have a room like this in my future house

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Surprise day off with my lovely lady. Checking out the farmers market and having brunch at #mercato #hangingwithmywife

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ancientart:

The faces of Bayon.

Bayon is a richly decorated Khmer temple, located at Angkor, Cambodia. "The serenity of the stone faces" (Glaize, 1993) strikes one while walking through Bayon.

Photos courtesy of & taken by yeowatzup.

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languagethatiuse:

The Temptations. 

Swag

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rollingstone:

The 20 biggest summer songs of the Nineties are surprisingly grunge-free. Hear them now.

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skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)

You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.

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updownsmilefrown:

Frank Sinatra backstage at the Paramount Theater, 1944

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"Now if you’ll excuse me, I’m going to go on an overnight drunk, and in 10 days I’m going to set out to find the shark that ate my friend and destroy it. Anyone who wants to join me is more than welcome." - The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou

Still one of my favorites

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Sounds awesome!

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imperialorganics:

1” (25mm) Eden Valley Petrified Wood Plugs available HERE

Want

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